A History of the Crusades, Volume V: The impact of the by Kenneth M. Setton, Norman P. Zacour, Harry W. Hazard

By Kenneth M. Setton, Norman P. Zacour, Harry W. Hazard

The six volumes of A background of the Crusades will stand because the definitive heritage of the Crusades, spanning 5 centuries, encompassing Jewish, Moslem, and Christian views, and containing a wealth of knowledge and research of the heritage, politics, economics, and tradition of the medieval international.

Show description

Read Online or Download A History of the Crusades, Volume V: The impact of the crusades on the Near East PDF

Similar middle east books

Ancient Iraq (3rd Edition)

Newly revised and containing details from contemporary excavations and stumbled on artifacts, historic Iraq covers the political, cultural, and socio-economic historical past from Mesopotamia days of prehistory to the Christian period.

Erasing Iraq: The Human Costs of Carnage

For almost 20 years, the united states and its allies have prosecuted battle and aggression in Iraq. Erasing Iraq exhibits in unprecedented element the devastating human fee. Western governments and the mainstream media proceed to disregard or play down the human expenses of the struggle on Iraqi voters This has allowed them to offer their function because the benign guardians of Iraqi pursuits.

A History of the Crusades, Volume V: The impact of the crusades on the Near East

The six volumes of A background of the Crusades will stand because the definitive heritage of the Crusades, spanning 5 centuries, encompassing Jewish, Moslem, and Christian views, and containing a wealth of data and research of the historical past, politics, economics, and tradition of the medieval international.

Marc Chagall: The Jerusalem Windows

Marc Chagall: The Jerusalem home windows.

Extra resources for A History of the Crusades, Volume V: The impact of the crusades on the Near East

Sample text

Another compiler reflecting the same trend is 'Ali ibn-Zaid ai-Baibaqi (d. 1169),99 who is chiefly known for his biographical dictionary, entitled Ta'rikh }Jukama' ai-ls/am (The history of the learned men of Islam), which was a supplement to an earlier biographical dictionary of learned men, the $iwan ai-}Jikmah of Mubammad as-Sijistiini of the second half of the tenth century. AJ-Baihaqi also wrote, in Persian, a history of his birthplace, Baihaq, which he completed a year before his death. The shift in emphasis from general to local histories is likewise demonstrated by the work of 'Umarab ibn-'Ali ai-Yamani (d.

SOrah IX:29. 16 A HIS10RY OF THB CRUSADES v It bas already been suggested that Arab culture was a palace culture, flourishing under the patronage of caliph, sultan, or prince, its benefits rarely reaching beyond the confmes of the royal or princely court. It should be added, too, that Arab culture has been, for the most part, a masculine culture, in which women played a very minor role. By the end of the tenth Christian century Arab women had lost the greater part of their freedom and dignity. Under the Buwaihids, the system of total segregation of the sexes and stringent seclusion of women had become general.

Between al-Ghazzali and Maimonides no Arab philosopher of note can be cited, perhaps because the main concern of the century was not in speculation but rather in systematization, as evidenced in the works of Fakhr-ad-Dln ar-Riizi (d. 1209) and Najm-ad-Dln an-Nasafi (d. 1142), whose 'Aqii'id (Articles of faith) became the most popular statement of the Moslem creed, the nearest thing to a Moslem catechism, forming the basis for innumerable commentaries and glosses. The trend toward systematization is further seen in the intellectual activities of ash-Shabrastiini (d.

Download PDF sample

Rated 4.54 of 5 – based on 16 votes