Spinning Fantasies: Rabbis, Gender, and History by Miriam B. Peskowitz

By Miriam B. Peskowitz

Miriam Peskowitz bargains a dramatic revision to our figuring out of early rabbinic Judaism. utilizing quite a lot of sources--archaeology, criminal texts, grave items, expertise, paintings, and writings in Hebrew, Aramaic, Greek, and Latin--she demanding situations conventional assumptions relating to Judaism's old development.Following the destruction of the Jerusalem Temple via Roman armies in 70 C.E., new incarnations of Judaism emerged. of those, rabbinic Judaism used to be the main profitable, turning into the classical kind of the faith. via historical tales concerning Jewish spinners and weavers, Peskowitz re-examines this severe second in Jewish background and offers a feminist interpretation within which gender takes heart level. She exhibits how notions of male and female have been constructed through the rabbis of Roman Palestine and why the differences have been so vital within the formation in their spiritual and criminal tradition.Rabbinic consciousness to ladies, males, sexuality, and gender came about in the "ordinary tedium of daily life, in acts that have been either ordinary and mundane." whereas spinners and weavers played what gave the look of traditional initiatives, their craft was once in truth symbolic of bigger gender and sexual concerns, which Peskowitz deftly explicates. Her learn of historical spinning and her plentiful resource fabric will set new criteria within the fields of gender reports, Jewish reviews, and cultural experiences.

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Spinning Fantasies: Rabbis, Gender, and History (Contraversions: Critical Studies in Jewish Literature, Culture, and Society)

Miriam Peskowitz bargains a dramatic revision to our realizing of early rabbinic Judaism. utilizing a variety of sources--archaeology, felony texts, grave items, know-how, artwork, and writings in Hebrew, Aramaic, Greek, and Latin--she demanding situations conventional assumptions concerning Judaism's ancient improvement.

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Additional resources for Spinning Fantasies: Rabbis, Gender, and History (Contraversions: Critical Studies in Jewish Literature, Culture, and Society)

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Can men ever be "like women"? In the case of the unmarried men, no women are present. Yehudah's examples contain only men. Men are the lone cattle herders. Men share cloaked coverings as they sleep. In other words, since no women are present, the standards of yihud have already been met. " Generally, the sexuality of women is regarded with suspicion. i... that they are regarded with the same kind of suspicion. The unmarried male cattle herder is trusted no more than a woman. Yehudah's prohibition is built on the belief that women and men might share some character traits, traits which other rabbis and Jews might prefer be linked either to one or to the other.

A man may share a bed at an inn with female relatives, including his mother and daughter. A man may be alone with his mother, and with his minor daughter, even to the extent of sleeping next to them in positions where their bodies touch, and even if each is naked. But age will change this. If the daughter is adult, she ― 58 ― and her father may sleep together in the same bed only so long as each is clothed. The example attends to men, women, and families on the road, away from home. In writing about yihud , rabbis, and anyone who wrote or repeated or read or heard these texts, can contemplate a number of situations and possibilities.

These two classifications are combined to form four categories: time-bound positive commandments, non-time-bound positive commandments, time-bound negative commandments, and non-time-bound negative commandments. All four groups are incumbent upon adult male Jews. For men's Jewish practices, these divisions are largely superfluous. There is no direct halakic result. Whether or not a commandment is positive or negative, time-bound or not simply does not matter. In this new rabbinic system, mitzvot are enmeshed in gender.

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